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Kidd Pivot's "Tempest Replica" | Photo Jorg Baumann Kidd Pivot's "Tempest Replica" | Photo Jorg Baumann

REVIEW: Kidd Pivot’s “The Tempest Replica” at the Joyce Theater

Rock-star choreographer. Shakespeare. Cool, full-body costumes that turn top-notch dancers into chalk-white mannequins. On the surface, Kidd Pivot’s “Tempest Replica,” which ran at the Joyce last week, was replete with intriguing ingredients. Unfortunately, however, they didn’t combine as successfully as promised. True to its name, “Tempest Replica” distills the Bard’s…

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Last Touch First | Photo Robert Benschop Last Touch First | Photo Robert Benschop

REVIEW: Jiří Kylián and Michael Schumacher’s “Last Touch First” at the Joyce Theater

In the world of film, slow motion is a no-brainer for building tension. Where slowing footage with a mouse click is simple, real people performing slow motion rarely reads as realistic and is difficult to sustain. These considerations do not strike fear but rather interest for choreographers Jiří Kylián and Michael…

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Sylvie Guillem in "Bye" | Photo Bill Cooper Sylvie Guillem in "Bye" | Photo Bill Cooper

REVIEW: Sylvie Guillem’s “6000 Miles Away” at Lincoln Center

Sylvie Guillem presents something of a conundrum for dance criticism. Typically, it’s possible to separate the dancer from the dance — to distinguish the merits of the choreography itself, from how the dancer executes it and brings it to life.

The 47-year-old Guillem has performed so many roles and styles over her long career that this would seem to be an easy task. And yet, watching her inhabit tailor-made works in “6000 Miles Away,” it was hard to imagine anyone else performing them — for she is one of those rare artists whose instrument alone expands the boundaries of what dance can express.

In the program recently staged by The Joyce at Lincoln Center, Sylvie’s instrument was in the hands of William Forsythe and Mats Ek, from whom the ballerina commissioned two original works to flank an excerpt from Jiří Kylián’s explosive “27’52”.”

For both Forsythe and Ek, classical ballet provides as much a foundation as a subject for artistic commentary. That is about where the similarities between the two choreographers end, however. Whereas Forsythe’s steely “Rearray” puts Guillem’s exceptional technique under a microscope, Ek gives it a back seat in “Bye” — a work that, best it can, portrays Sylvie as a normal human being.

VIDEO: Sidra Bell

The Creative Approach Season 3: Episode 4 | 5:17 Choreographer, dancer, teacher, and director Sidra Bell discusses her perspective on the artistry of dance and her creative approach to it. She also speaks about the advice she would give to her younger self. See our other Sidra Bell video (Intellect…

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VIDEO: Sidra Bell

Intellect and Physicality Season 3: Episode 3 | 6:35 For Sidra Bell, all roads led to dance. But the path was anything but direct. From a journey that began at the age of eight at the Dance Theater of Harlem and included an unlikely, yet critical diversion at Yale University,…

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Wendy Whelan in Labyrinth Within directed by Pontus Lidberg Wendy Whelan in Labyrinth Within directed by Pontus Lidberg

Pontus Lidberg’s Labyrinth Within at Baryshnikov Arts Center

Swedish choreographer and dancer Pontus Lindberg’s Labyrinth Within is a series of pas de deux on film that explores the lines between reality and perception. The majority of the 28 minute film, with a score created by David Lang (and recorded in 2009 by The Symphony Orchestra of Sweden’s Norrlands Operan) takes place in Giovanni Bucchieri and Wendy Whelan’s apartment. The two main characters are in the later years of a now stale marriage.

David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan

REVIEW: David Dorfman’s “Prophets of Funk” at the Joyce Theater

When “Prophets of Funk” opens at the Joyce Theater, Dorfman himself is the torch-bearer: the first mover we see. At first we are distracted by glitzy bell bottoms, afro-wigs and fringed vests, swept up in familiar sequences of ponies, grapevines, and snappy step-touch footwork. As if at a party suspended in time, we tap our foot to the familiar tunes and smile at the performers dancing together. It’s not all laymen’s steps– moments of line dancing are fluidly integrated with smooth turns, drops, and balances à la modern dance. Dorfman’s choreography calls for technique, theatricality, rhythm and charm. Video footage of the band is projected on the back screen and Sly himself is present (played by Raja Kelly). He has everyone in the palm of his hand.

Blueprint Summer Intensive| Graphic Courtesy Peridance Capezio Center Blueprint Summer Intensive| Graphic Courtesy Peridance Capezio Center

BLUEPRINT Summer Intensive at Peridance Capezio Center

Peridance Capezio Center in NYC has some exciting news for young dancers looking for a change of pace in the world of Summer Dance Intensives.

BLUEPRINT, a brand-new, two-week contemporary ballet intensive program in New York City, is set to take place August 20-September 1 2012. Auditions for this exciting opportunity have already begun and will continue internationally throughout the winter and spring. In collaboration with dance icon and founder of DancePulp Drew Jacoby, Peridance has brought together an irresistible faculty for professional dance hopefuls ages 16-22.