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VIDEO: Fall For Dance Festival 2015

It wouldn’t be back to school without the promise of Fall For Dance approaching.

This year we are proud to present the 2015 Fall For Dance Festival trailer, made in partnership with New York City Center. You’re just in time to make your picks — tickets go on sale this Sunday, September 13th at 11 AM.

VIDEO: Alexis Convento

Founder, Producing Director, and Lead Curator for The Current Sessions, sits down with DancePulp to talk about how the project based organization began, how it’s helping choreographers of our generation, and her own frustrations and goals as an art maker.

GHOST Part 2

In conjuction with GHOST Part 1, we bring you the performance footage right from the stage. In this video Drew Jacoby, Rubinald Pronk, Prince Credell, and Leo Mujic dance the original piece by Leo Mujic for Jacoby Pronk and Dancers. It was filmed in New Orleans, Louisiana in 2011. GHOST…


Video: GHOST

We’re delighted to finally revive some footage that has been sitting on an abandoned hard drive. In this video Drew Jacoby, Rubinald Pronk, Prince Credell, and Leo Mujic discuss the making of an original piece by Leo Mujic for Jacoby Pronk and Dancers. It was filmed in Belgrade, Serbia and…


artwork by Alice Klock artwork by Alice Klock

Artist Feature Series

Dance is a lifelong discipline of constant practice, study, effort and creativity. More often than we realize, dancers find themselves expressing the creative impulse in mediums other than movement. Whether they sketch, compose, cook, paint, collage, design, photograph or film they find a different side of themselves from the one…


Jonah Bokaer and Anthony McCall "ECLIPSE" | Photo Stephanie Berger Jonah Bokaer and Anthony McCall "ECLIPSE" | Photo Stephanie Berger

REVIEW: Jonah Bokaer’s ECLIPSE at BAM

Editor’s note: DancePulp would like to welcome Rick Herron, guest contributor and contemporary arts curator. We are thrilled to have him in the ongoing conversation of dance. The heat having finally broken, New Yorkers are back in town, getting down to business and starting a new season. New York Fashion…


Sylvie Guillem in "Bye" | Photo Bill Cooper Sylvie Guillem in "Bye" | Photo Bill Cooper

REVIEW: Sylvie Guillem’s “6000 Miles Away” at Lincoln Center

Sylvie Guillem presents something of a conundrum for dance criticism. Typically, it’s possible to separate the dancer from the dance — to distinguish the merits of the choreography itself, from how the dancer executes it and brings it to life.

The 47-year-old Guillem has performed so many roles and styles over her long career that this would seem to be an easy task. And yet, watching her inhabit tailor-made works in “6000 Miles Away,” it was hard to imagine anyone else performing them — for she is one of those rare artists whose instrument alone expands the boundaries of what dance can express.

In the program recently staged by The Joyce at Lincoln Center, Sylvie’s instrument was in the hands of William Forsythe and Mats Ek, from whom the ballerina commissioned two original works to flank an excerpt from Jiří Kylián’s explosive “27’52”.”

For both Forsythe and Ek, classical ballet provides as much a foundation as a subject for artistic commentary. That is about where the similarities between the two choreographers end, however. Whereas Forsythe’s steely “Rearray” puts Guillem’s exceptional technique under a microscope, Ek gives it a back seat in “Bye” — a work that, best it can, portrays Sylvie as a normal human being.

David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan

REVIEW: David Dorfman’s “Prophets of Funk” at the Joyce Theater

When “Prophets of Funk” opens at the Joyce Theater, Dorfman himself is the torch-bearer: the first mover we see. At first we are distracted by glitzy bell bottoms, afro-wigs and fringed vests, swept up in familiar sequences of ponies, grapevines, and snappy step-touch footwork. As if at a party suspended in time, we tap our foot to the familiar tunes and smile at the performers dancing together. It’s not all laymen’s steps– moments of line dancing are fluidly integrated with smooth turns, drops, and balances à la modern dance. Dorfman’s choreography calls for technique, theatricality, rhythm and charm. Video footage of the band is projected on the back screen and Sly himself is present (played by Raja Kelly). He has everyone in the palm of his hand.