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REVIEW: DanceNOW [NYC] Festival at Joe’s Pub

Joe’s Pub is my new venue crush. Instead of local bands as the accompaniment to dinner and drinks, why not see ten shorter selections from New York choreographers? I am all for it. This informal, small stage allows the choreographers a unique and momentary chance to carve their work to suit the space. Not just any piece is right for dining viewers, and the corner stage only allows for a few bodies. Tonight, the first night of four in the DanceNOW [NYC] Festival, offered a variety of diverse voices, but serendipitously some repeating trends arose. The format is satisfying because in a field where often pieces drone on, these short 5 minute appearances are glimpses that leave you wanting more. Out of ten selections, several stood out above the crowd.

REVIEW: Houston Ballet at the Joyce Theater

Houston Ballet took their debut spin around the Joyce stage last night with Falling Angels, ONE/end/ONE and Hush. Jiří Kylián’s Falling Angels, one of the choreographer’s fan favorites, is often selected by ballet companies to showcase contemporary capabilities. I have seen the piece before, performed by the National Ballet of Georgia, but this time Houston Ballet helps me notice a few new inner-workings. First, a heavy load of unison makes it difficult to choose whether to view the movement as a corps of moving bodies or to single out one individual to more closely study the quick, precise gestures. In this opening section, the movement is clean and minimalist, focused on arm angles correlated with Steve Reich’s drumbeats. For me…

Joyce Fall Season Opens Tomorrow with Flamenco

From September 20-25th The Joyce Theater opens its fall season with Israel Galván’s vibrant “Le Edad de Oro” or The Golden Age, a full length solo flamenco performance accompanied by live musicians. In a Joyce lineup that often features full dance companies, Mr. Galván’s work is uniquely captivating, as is his philosophy on dance.

REVIEW: Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet Intensive Students Perform 360º Installation

Last night, students of the Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet summer 2011 Intensive Program performed in an interactive installation piece at Cedar Lake’s homebase in NYC. In the current performance trend of audience free-flow, the installation directed viewers to and from five different stage spaces, making the experience somewhat of a choose-your-own-adventure, as dancing occured simultaneously in opposite directions. The cutting-edge tone of the evening, incorporating multi-media video projection, aerial work, sculpture, and live musical score shows that CLCB is committed to showing their students the real deal of the current dance world. It re-imagines the audience relationship, and frames the dancing in a world of other visual design elements.

Lincoln Center Festival Ticket Giveaway!

In an exciting return to the US, Mariinsky Ballet, under the direction of Valery Gergiev will be performing Ratmansky’s Little Humpbacked Horse as part of their engagement with Lincoln Center Festival.Dance Pulp is giving away two free tickets! We want to give them to you! Read on to find out how you can win!

Dance Moves People graphic Joshua Martens

Why Does Dance Matter?

Editors Note: This is a collaborative post between Drew Jacoby and Emeri Fetzer and we hope to engage our readers in discussion. An important aspect of the mission of DancePulp is to encourage our followers to think about the importance of dance and to actively support arts advocacy. Early this…

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REVIEW: Week Two Gotham Dance Festival

Tuesday night, Kate Weare Company took the Joyce stage in the continuation of Gotham Dance Festival. Weare showed two works: “Lean-to” a popular piece from 2009, and a world premiere of the mystical and lush “Garden,” Weare’s newest creation. After this, my first encounter with the company, I am smitten.

“Lean-to” is as on edge as it gets. The curtain rises to reveal a starkly white, sail-like structure by Kurt Perschke as a power trio (dancers Adrian Clark, Douglas Gillespie and the unforgettable Leslie Kraus) surely and slowly initiate an interaction which cannot be distinguished as battle or alliance.

REVIEW: Week One Gotham Dance Festival

This week, I’ve been spending my evenings at the Joyce Theater for the jam packed Gotham Dance Festival, compiled by Ken Maldonado of Gotham Arts Exchange. This summer, Gotham Dance Festival offers up ten choreographers, showing world premieres as well as past repertoire. After a few days of reflection and gathering various reviews of performances, my own reactions to Brian Brooks Moving Company and Monica Bill Barnes and Company are still resonating. I’m left chewing on two remaining themes: repetition and character environment.

Aspirations Mid Career

In my last blog I wrote about inspiration, but mentioned that there were three questions that I frequently am asked. I’ve answered about where I find inspiration, so this entry I’d like to delve into what I strive for now at this point in my career. And like last time, I’ll start with the most obvious.

I am always trying to perfect my technique. I don’t think this is unusual. In fact, I think it is the most boring answer a dancer can give when asked what they strive for. But nonetheless, it is absolutely true and a constant thought and force in my life.

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An Inside Look at Armitage Gone! Dance Spring Season at the Joyce Theater

This week, Armitage Gone! Dance, under the direction of daring choreographer Karole Armitage, took the stage at the Joyce Theater in New York for a two week, two program concert run spanning from April 26-May 8th. The show, no matter what night you choose to see it, promises to be anything but tame. With seven rehearsals to go before the dancers moved into the theater,  I sat down with Karole Armitage at the company’s rehearsal home, Dance Theatre of Harlem, to get a sneak peek of both her new work and repertory that has been refreshed and revamped for this unique company season. Program A of the Armitage Gone! Dance season will incorporate Ligeti Essays and Drastic Classicism, both older works continuously evolving since creation, as well as  the world premiere of Armitage’s newest work GAGA-GaKu, performed with selected members of Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble. Program B will show Three Theories, a full-evening piece premiered in 2010 dealing in universal physical laws and phenomena. In my observation of two of Armitage’s pieces, Ligeti Essays and GAGA-Gaku,  it didn’t take long for  me to realize the full scale of Armitage’s ambition, fed by a fascination with human experience.

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