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Emeri Fetzer

Emeri is Managing Editor of DancePulp.com and a full–time freelance performer. Emeri most recently danced in Punchdrunk's 'Sleep No More' NYC and in original choreography for PITH Dance. Originally from Salt Lake City, Utah, with BA’s in Dance Choreography and English from Goucher College, Emeri loves to marry writing with a strong passion for movement. She is also a regular contributor for Theater Development Fund's online magazine TDF Stages.

BODYTRAFFIC | Photo Ruby Washington BODYTRAFFIC | Photo Ruby Washington

REVIEW: BODYTRAFFIC at Gotham Dance Festival 2012

This Wednesday night the Gotham Dance Festival went cross-coastal with L.A. based BODYTRAFFIC, resulting in some serious fun. In the work of three international choreographers, Barak Marshall, Stjin Celis and Richard Siegel, BODYTRAFFIC displayed their strong capacity for technique, theatrics and overall exuberance. First introduced to the culturally critical dances…

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Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet in "Violet Kid" | Photo by Juileta Cervantes Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet in "Violet Kid" | Photo by Juileta Cervantes

Cedar Lake Finally Dances in New York

For a year and a half, Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet has performed almost everywhere but New York City. But from May 15-27 they are back at the Joyce Theater with two programs. They’ll feature six pieces by six different choreographers, five NYC premieres, and one world premiere. Ana-Maria Lucaciu, one…

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Movie Poster for Documentary Film "First Position" Movie Poster for Documentary Film "First Position"

FILM PREVIEW: First Position

First Position is a documentary tracking young ballet dancers in competition for the the annual Youth America Grand Prix. Outsiders of the dance world often marvel at the discipline, commitment and sheer tenacity of those trying to be professionals in the business. Dancers however, never think twice about what it…

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Last Touch First | Photo Robert Benschop Last Touch First | Photo Robert Benschop

REVIEW: Jiří Kylián and Michael Schumacher’s “Last Touch First” at the Joyce Theater

In the world of film, slow motion is a no-brainer for building tension. Where slowing footage with a mouse click is simple, real people performing slow motion rarely reads as realistic and is difficult to sustain. These considerations do not strike fear but rather interest for choreographers Jiří Kylián and Michael…

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Faces from Gardenia | Photo Luk Moonsaert Faces from Gardenia | Photo Luk Moonsaert

Montclair State University’s Peak Performances

Many loyal dance-goers often focus their attention on performances within Manhattan and Brooklyn. But Montclair State University’s unique series Peak Performances gives us more than one reason to consider a short bus or train ride to Jersey.

This past weekend, I traveled to the Alexander Kasser Theater to see the US Premiere of Gardenia, a collaboration between Alain Platel, the artistic director of Les Ballets C de la B, theater director Frank van Laecke–both influenced by renowned Belgian playwright Vanessa Van Durme. Gardenia is more abstract theater piece than dance. But a close look reveals that movement is certainly at the core of this tale of transgender performers and their closing cabaret club. Platel’s trained eye for space, gesture and physicality brings a richness to a story that would be quite difficult to convey only in dialogue.

Batsheva Dance Company in Ohad Naharin's "Hora" | Photo Gadi Dagon Batsheva Dance Company in Ohad Naharin's "Hora" | Photo Gadi Dagon

REVIEW: Batsheva Dance Company’s “Hora” at BAM

It is tempting to be led headfirst into the implied meanings of a work entitled Hora.

But from the instant lights rise on an arresting neon green backdrop, I am thrown from any image of ancient circle dances I had conjured from the title. The voluminous space of the Howard Gilman Opera House at BAM is cut low by the dense color and a wooden bench spanning the back wall. The Batsheva Dance Company seems transported to a space altogther other-worldly. With deadpan but deadly focused faces, the dancers slowly walk forward in a straight line. When the army of eleven retreats again to the bench, short spurts of solos begin. We indulge in very “gaga” postures, walks, quirks and balances that are signature of the company. But before long they are all dancing in a flurry of unrelated chaos.

We cannot possibly watch them all. Just when the action seems overwhelming, choreographer Ohad Naharin gathers it in stillness.

Camille Brown in "Evolution of A Secured Feminine" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan Camille Brown in "Evolution of A Secured Feminine" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan

REVIEW: Camille A. Brown and Dancers at The Joyce Theater

When you spend the evening with Camille A. Brown, you leave feeling that you are one of her closest friends.

The effect boggles me. Brown’s compositions seduce you into their center, as if you stumbled into the middle of a complex family history or an intimate conversation you were not fully prepared for. Brown is an honest mover, who carries in her dancing body her own journey, which means she bears all. She hides no idiosyncrasies, but rather delves into her uniqueness to find its source. She cultivates in her dancers truer versions of themselves so that even as they do her movement, they are set apart. Placed in an environment of socially conscious choreography that often allows performers freedom of theatricality, Brown’s combination of concept and execution is striking.

David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan David Dorfman's "Prophets of Funk" | Photo Credit Christopher Duggan

REVIEW: David Dorfman’s “Prophets of Funk” at the Joyce Theater

When “Prophets of Funk” opens at the Joyce Theater, Dorfman himself is the torch-bearer: the first mover we see. At first we are distracted by glitzy bell bottoms, afro-wigs and fringed vests, swept up in familiar sequences of ponies, grapevines, and snappy step-touch footwork. As if at a party suspended in time, we tap our foot to the familiar tunes and smile at the performers dancing together. It’s not all laymen’s steps– moments of line dancing are fluidly integrated with smooth turns, drops, and balances à la modern dance. Dorfman’s choreography calls for technique, theatricality, rhythm and charm. Video footage of the band is projected on the back screen and Sly himself is present (played by Raja Kelly). He has everyone in the palm of his hand.